AGENDA

Sport and Recreation Committee

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leonie Hapeta (Chairperson)

Duncan McCann (Deputy Chairperson)

Grant Smith (The Mayor)

Brent Barrett

Jim Jefferies

Adrian Broad

Lorna Johnson

Vaughan Dennison

Bruno Petrenas

Lew Findlay QSM

Aleisha Rutherford

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

 

 

 

Sport and Recreation Committee MEETING

 

14 May 2018

 

 

 

Order of Business

 

NOTE: The Sport and Recreation Committee meeting coincides with the ordinary meeting of the Economic Development Committee meeting and the extraordinary Council meeting.  The format for the meeting will be as follows:

-             Sport and Recreation Committee will open and adjourn immediately to follow Economic Development Committee

-              Economic Development  Committee will open and adjourn immediately to follow Council

-              Council will open, conduct its business and then close.

1.         Apologies

2.         Notification of Additional Items

Pursuant to Sections 46A(7) and 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987, to receive the Chairperson’s explanation that specified item(s), which do not appear on the Agenda of this meeting and/or the meeting to be held with the public excluded, will be discussed.

Any additions in accordance with Section 46A(7) must be approved by resolution with an explanation as to why they cannot be delayed until a future meeting.

Any additions in accordance with Section 46A(7A) may be received or referred to a subsequent meeting for further discussion.  No resolution, decision or recommendation can be made in respect of a minor item.

3.         Declarations of Interest (if any)

            Members are reminded of their duty to give a general notice of any interest of items to be considered on this agenda and the need to declare these interests.

 

4.         Public Comment

To receive comments from members of the public on matters specified on this Agenda or, if time permits, on other Committee matters.

(NOTE:     If the Committee wishes to consider or discuss any issue raised that is not specified on the Agenda, other than to receive the comment made or refer it to the Chief Executive, then a resolution will need to be made in accordance with clause 2 above.)

5.         Deputation - Raleigh Reserve Whanau Project                                                Page 7

6.         Submissions - Proposal to License Pascal Street Community Trust to ocupy part of Awapuni Park or Alexander Park for Community Gardens                                            Page 9

7.         Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                  Page 41

“That the minutes of the Sport and Recreation Committee meeting of 12 March 2018 Part I Public be confirmed as a true and correct record.”  

8.         Memorial Park Capital Budget Priorities 2018-2028                                      Page 49

Report, dated 30 January 2018 from the Leisure Assets Planner, Jason Pilkington.

9.         Campbell Street Campervan Carpark Trial                                                     Page 72

Report, dated 9 April 2018 from the Leisure Assets Planner, Jason Pilkington.

10.       Palmerston North Self-Contained Campervan Dump Stations                    Page 84

Report, dated 11 April 2018 from the Leisure Assets Planner, Jason Pilkington.

11.       Manawaroa Park Toilet Facilities                                                                  Page 106

Memorandum, dated 14 March 2018 from the Building Asset Officer, Ian Stuart.

12.       Fitzherbert Park - Cricket Ground Enhancements Update                          Page 108

Memorandum, dated 26 April 2018 from the Parks & Property Manager, John Brenkley.

13.       Committee Work Schedule                                                                            Page 112

    

 14.      Exclusion of Public

 

 

To be moved:

“That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting listed in the table below.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under Section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

 

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under Section 48(1) for passing this resolution

15.

Minutes of the Sport and Recreation Committee meeting - Part II Confidential - 12 March 2018

For the reasons setout in the Sport and Recreation Committee minutes of 12 March 2018, held in public present.

16.

Uplifting Artificial Football Turf Report

Negotiations

s7(2)(i)

17.

Artificial Football Turf - Process for Location Selection

Negotiations

s7(2)(i)

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public as stated in the above table.

Also that the persons listed below be permitted to remain after the public has been excluded for the reasons stated.

Chief Executive (Heather Shotter), Chief Financial Officer (Grant Elliott), General Manager, City Enterprises (Ray McIndoe), General Manager, City Future (Sheryl Bryant), General Manager, City Networks (Ray Swadel), General Manager, Customer Services (Peter Eathorne), General Manager, Libraries and Community Services (Debbie Duncan), Human Resources Manager (Wayne Wilson), General Manager, Marketing and Communications (Sacha Haskell), and Communications Advisor (name) because of their knowledge and ability to provide the meeting with advice on matters both from an organisation-wide context (being members of the Council’s Management Team) and also from their specific role within the Council.

Legal Counsel (John Annabell), because of his knowledge and ability to provide the meeting with legal and procedural advice.

Governance and Support Team Leader (Kyle Whitfield) and Committee Administrators (Penny Odell, Carly Chang and Rachel Corser), because of their knowledge and ability to provide the meeting with procedural advice and record the proceedings of the meeting.

Policy Analyst (Ann-Marie Mori), Senior Property and Parks Planner (Aaron Phillips), Straegy and Policy Manager (Julie Macdonlad) and Parks and Property Manager (John Brenkley) because of their knowledge and ability to assist the meeting in speaking to their report and answering questions, noting that such officer will be present at the meeting only for the item that relate to their respective report.

[Add Third Parties], because of their knowledge and ability to assist the meeting in speaking to their report/s [or other matters as specified] and answering questions, noting that such person/s will be present at the meeting only for the items that relate to their respective report/s [or matters as specified].

 

 

  


 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Deputation

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Deputation - Raleigh Reserve Whanau Project

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Sport and Recreation Committee

1.   That the Sport and Recreation Committee receive the deputation for information.

 

 

Summary

Daryl Anne, Kim Stewart, David Chapple, Rodney Wong & Kevin Gilbert, representatives from the Raleigh Reserve Whanau Project, will provide a Deputation, giving an update on the project.

 

 

Attachments

Nil   



 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Submission From Consultation

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Submissions - Proposal to License Pascal Street Community Trust to ocupy part of Awapuni Park or Alexander Park for Community Gardens

 

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Sport and Recreation Committee

1.   That the Sport and Recreation Committee hear submissions from presenters who indicated their wish to be heard in support of their submission.

2.   That the Committee note the Procedure for Hearing of Submissions, as described in the procedure sheet.

 

 

Submitters wishing to be heard in support of their submission

13.

Katheryn M Pascoe

18.

Annette Nixon

21.

Plant to Plate Aotearoa Trust Board

23.

Norelle Ward

 

SUBMITTERS  NOT WISHING TO BE HEARD IN SUPPORT OF THEIR SUBMISSION

1.

Joanna Kangishe

2.

Jacqu Aldridge

3.

Wayne Simpson

4.

Iola Haggarty

5.

Joy Wood

6.

Shannon

7.

Jiajia Liu

8.

Michelle Platt

9.

Aaron Zaloum

10.

Melody Lawrence

11.

Daryl-Anne George

12.

Ian Thompson

14.

Alison Geange

15.

Jude Priest

16.

Daniel Rexner

17.

Bruce Geange

19.

Marilyn and Bruce Bulloch

20.

Carol Milne and 51 petitioners

22.

Amy Lavini

24

Stephen and Joella Lauridsen & Ray and Pat Symonds

 

 

Attachments

1.

Procedure Sheet

 

2.

Submissions

 

    


PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator

  


 

Palmerston North City Council

 

Minutes of the Sport and Recreation Committee Meeting Part I Public, held in the Council Chamber, First Floor, Civic Administration Building, 32 The Square, Palmerston North on 12 March 2018, commencing at 9.00am

Members

Present:

Councillor Leonie Hapeta (in the Chair), The Mayor (Grant Smith) and Councillors Brent Barrett, Adrian Broad, Lew Findlay QSM, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Bruno Petrenas and Aleisha Rutherford.

Non Members:

Councillors Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Karen Naylor and Tangi Utikere.

Apologies:

The Mayor (Grant Smith ) (for early departure).

 

Councillor Vaughan Dennison was present when the meeting resumed at 11.00am.  He was not present for clause 1.

 

Councillor Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke left the meeting at 12.19pm at the conclusion  of clause 4.  She entered the meeting again at 12.20pm at the conclusion of clause 5.  She was not present for clause 5.

 

The Mayor (Grant Smith) left the meeting at 12.25pm at the conclusion of clause 5.  He was present for clauses 1 to 5 inclusive.  

1-18

Apologies

 

Moved Leonie Hapeta, seconded Lorna Johnson.

The COMMITTEE RESOLVED

1.   That the Committee receive the apologies.

 

Clause 1-18 above was carried 15 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

The Mayor (Grant Smith) and Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Karen Naylor, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

 

The meeting adjourned at 9.01am

The meeting resumed at 11.00am

 

When the meeting resumed Councillor Vaughan Dennison was present.

 

2-18

Presentation - Manawatū kids triathlon

Presentation from Andy Martin, from Manawatu Triathlon Club regarding the ”I tried the Tri’s” series.

The “I tried the Tri’s” event had started in 2004 and now had 750 kids competing each week.  The $5 entry fee had remained the same over the past 15 years and by now accepting online pre-entries the majority of registrations were completed prior to the first night.

Mr Martin believed that the event could keep going as they were always looking to improve and there was good support within the Manawatu Triathlon Club. 

There were a number of past participants that were now competing on the international stage and this looked to continue with current participants achieving at high levels in their respective sports.

 

Moved Leonie Hapeta, seconded Aleisha Rutherford.

The COMMITTEE RESOLVED

1.   That the Sport and Recreation Committee receive the presentation for information.

 

Clause 2-18 above was carried 16 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

The Mayor (Grant Smith) and Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Karen Naylor, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

  

3-18

Confirmation of Minutes

 

Moved Duncan McCann, seconded Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke.

The COMMITTEE RESOLVED

1.  That the minutes of the Sport and Recreation Committee meeting of 4      December 2017 Part I Public be confirmed as a true and correct record.

 

Clause 3-18 above was carried 15 votes to 0, with 1 abstention, the voting being as follows:

For:

Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Karen Naylor, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

Abstained:

The Mayor (Grant Smith).

 

4-18

Sport Manawatū 6 month report for the period ended 31 December 2017

Report, dated 20 February 2018 from the Senior Property & Parks Planner, Aaron Phillips.

 

Moved Duncan McCann, seconded Rachel Bowen.

The COMMITTEE RESOLVED

1.   That the Committee receives Sport Manawatū’s 6 month report for the period ended 31 December 2017.

 

Clause 4-18 above was carried 16 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

The Mayor (Grant Smith) and Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Karen Naylor, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

 

Councillor Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke left the meeting at 12.19pm

 

5-18

Submissions - Crewe Park Proposed Lease to Pascal Street Community Trust

Memorandum, dated 13 February 2018 from the Committee Administrator, Penny Odell.

 

Moved Tangi Utikere, seconded Aleisha Rutherford.

The COMMITTEE RESOLVED

1.   That the Sport and Recreation Committee receive the submissions on “Crewe Park Proposed Lease to Pascal Street Community Trust”.

 

Clause 5-18 above was carried 14 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

The Mayor (Grant Smith) and Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

Note:
Councillor Karen Naylor declared a conflict of interest and withdrew from voting and discussion on clause 5-18 above.

 

Councillor Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke entered the meeting at 12.20pm

The Mayor (Grant Smith) left the meeting at 12.25pm

 

6-18

Proposal to Lease a Section of Crewe Park to Pascal Street Community Trust

Report, dated 14 February 2018 from the Leisure Assets Planner, Jason Pilkington.

 

Moved Vaughan Dennison, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke.

The COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS

1.   That Palmerston North City Council, in the report Proposal to Lease a Section of Crewe Park to Pascal Street Community Trust, dated 14 February 2018 by Jason Pilkington, and as the administering body of Crewe Park, authorises the lease of approximately 85 square metres of Crewe Park as described in Appendix I (as part of Lot 11 DP20721) to Pascal Street Community Trust.

2.   That Palmerston North City Council, in the report Proposal to Lease a Section of Crewe Park to Pascal Street Community Trust, dated 14 February 2018 by Jason Pilkington and in exercise of the powers conferred on it by delegation under the Reserves Act 1977, authorises the lease of approximately 85 square metres of Crewe Park as described in Appendix I (as part of Lot 11 DP20721) to Pascal Street Community Trust.

3.   That Council note that the requirements of Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 have been satisfied in relation to consultation with Iwi over granting a lease at Crewe Park. 

4.   That Council note that the requirements of Sections 119 and 120 of the Reserves Act 1977 have been satisfied in relation to public notification prior to the resolution to enter into a lease at Crewe Park.

 

Clause 6-18 above was carried 14 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

Note:
Councillor Karen Naylor declared a conflict of interest and withdrew from voting and discussion on clause 6-18 above.

 

7-18

Proposal to Licence Pascal Street Community Trust to occupy part of Awapuni Park or Alexander Park for Community Gardens

Report, dated 13 February 2018 from the Senior Property & Parks Planner, Aaron Phillips.

 

Moved Rachel Bowen, seconded Vaughan Dennison.

The COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS

1.   That Council adopts the proposal to licence a section of Awapuni Park or Alexander Park (as described in Appendix One of the report titled Proposal to Licence Pascal Street Community Trust to occupy a section of Awapuni Park or Alexander Park for Community Gardens) to go out for public notice in the manner required under Section 54 (1) - (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Clause 7-18 above was carried 14 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

Note:
Councillor Karen Naylor declared a conflict of interest and withdrew from voting and discussion on clause 7-18 above.

 

Moved Aleisha Rutherford, seconded Susan Baty.

 

Note:

On a motion that: Council adopts the proposal to licence a section of Awapuni Park or Alexander Park (as described in Appendix One of the report titled Proposal to Licence Pascal Street Community Trust to occupy a section of Awapuni Park or Alexander Park for Community Gardens) to go out for public notice in the manner required under Section 54 (1) - (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.  The motion was lost 4 votes to 10, the voting being as follows:

For:

Councillors Susan Baty, Leonie Hapeta, Bruno Petrenas and Aleisha Rutherford.

Against:

Councillors Brent Barrett, Rachel Bowen, Adrian Broad, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson Duncan McCann, and Tangi Utikere.

 

8-18

Committee Work Schedule

 

Moved Tangi Utikere, seconded Duncan McCann.

The COMMITTEE RESOLVED

1.   That the Sport and Recreation Committee receive its Work Schedule dated March 2018.

 

Clause 8-18 above was carried 14 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Karen Naylor, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

      

Exclusion of Public

9-18

Recommendation to Exclude Public

 

Moved Lorna Johnson, seconded Karen Naylor.

The COMMITTEE RESOLVED

“That the public be excluded from the following parts of the proceedings of this meeting listed in the table below.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under Section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution are as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General subject of each matter to be considered

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Ground(s) under Section 48(1) for passing this resolution

12.

Minutes of the Sport and Recreation Committee meeting - Part II Confidential - 4 December 2017

For the reasons set out in the Sport and Recreation Committee minutes of 4 December 2017, held in public present.

13

Artificial Football Turf - Process for Location Selection

Negotiations

s7(2)(i)

14.

 

Presentation - Ashhurst Pool update

Negotiations

s7(2)(i)

 

This resolution is made in reliance on Section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by Section 6 or Section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public as stated in the above table.

Also that the persons listed below be permitted to remain after the public has been excluded for the reasons stated.

Chief Executive (Heather Shotter), Chief Financial Officer (Grant Elliott), General Manager, City Enterprises (Ray McIndoe), General Manager, City Future (Sheryl Bryant), General Manager, City Networks (Ray Swadel), General Manager, Customer Services (Peter Eathorne), General Manager, Libraries and Community Services (Debbie Duncan), Human Resources Manager (Wayne Wilson) and Communications and Marketing Manager (or their representative (name)) because of their knowledge and ability to provide the meeting with advice on matters both from an organisation-wide context (being members of the Council’s Management Team) and also from their specific role within the Council.

Legal Counsel (John Annabell), because of his knowledge and ability to provide the meeting with legal and procedural advice.

Governance and Support Team Leader (Kyle Whitfield) and Committee Administrators (Penny Odell, Carly Chang and Rachel Corser), because of their knowledge and ability to provide the meeting with procedural advice and record the proceedings of the meeting.

Senior Property and Parks Officer (Aaron Phillips), Policy Analyst (Ann-Marie Mori),  Parks and Property Manager (John Brenkley), Strategy and Policy Manager (Julie Macdonald) and Property Officer (Bryce Hosking) because of their knowledge and ability to assist the meeting in speaking to their report and answering questions, noting that such officer will be present at the meeting only for the item that relate to their respective report.

 

 

Clause 9-18 above was carried 14 votes to 0, the voting being as follows:

For:

Councillors Brent Barrett, Susan Baty, Rachel Bowen, Gabrielle Bundy-Cooke, Vaughan Dennison, Lew Findlay QSM, Leonie Hapeta, Jim Jefferies, Lorna Johnson, Duncan McCann, Karen Naylor, Bruno Petrenas, Aleisha Rutherford and Tangi Utikere.

 

The public part of the meeting finished at 1.11pm

 

Confirmed 14 May 2018

 

 

 

Chairperson



 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Report

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Memorial Park Capital Budget Priorities 2018-2028

DATE:                            30 January 2018

AUTHOR/S:                   Jason Pilkington, Leisure Assets Planner, City Networks

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Council

1.   That Council endorse the priorities for the capital works programme at Memorial Park for the 2018 to 2028 years, as stated in Table 2, Section 4.7 of the report titled Memorial Park Capital Budget Priorities 2018-28.

2.   That the Table 2 priorities, budget estimates, and timings be referred to the 2018-28 10 Year Plan final deliberation process including bringing the funding for the Splash Pad at Memorial Park forward by one year – from the 2019/20 financial year to the 2018/19 financial year.

3.   That Council, upon adoption of the 10 Year Plan and provided that the Memorial Park Capital Development Programme remains significantly unchanged, directs the Chief Executive to apply to external funders for an additional $250,000 in funding for the Splash Pad at Memorial Park.

4.   That Council directs the Chief Executive to use the necessary discretion to decide the amount of each application to the various Trusts, but that the total amount of all applications will not exceed $250,000.

 


 

Summary of options analysis for

 

Problem or Opportunity

The Memorial Park Development Plan was adopted by Council in December 2017. Councillors directed Officers at that meeting to develop funding priorities and timeframes for the Memorial Park Capital Development Programme, and to present the findings to the March 2018 Sport and Recreation Committee.

OPTION 1:

Council adopts the priorities for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme.

Community Views

During public consultation on the Memorial Park Development Plan the community prioritised each of the features proposed in the development plan. This information is attached as Appendix I.

Benefits

This option balances the priorities established during the community consultation process with the pragmatics of stakeholder needs and construction considerations.

Risks

Priorities of some stakeholders and the community with respect to the consultation results do not align well.

Financial

This recommendation requires Council to bring forward $250,000 from the 2019/20 financial year to the 2018/19 financial year in the 2018-28 10 Year Plan.

OPTION 2:

Council adopts the priorities for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme, with amendments as determined by the Sport and Recreation Committee.

Community Views

During public consultation on the Memorial Park Development Plan the community prioritised each of the features proposed in the development plan. This information is attached as Appendix I.

Benefits

Allows Council to make any necessary amendments while maintaining the base plan that was previously consulted on.

Risks

May impact upon the good faith established during the community consultation (dependent upon the scale and nature of the amendments). 

Financial

This option requires Council to bring forward $250,000 from the 2019/20 financial year to the 2018/19 financial year in the 2018-28 10 Year Plan. This option may have financial implications, but this is dependent upon the nature and scale of the amendments adopted by Council.

OPTION 3:

Council adopts the priorities as sought from the community during consultation for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme.

Community Views

During public consultation on the Memorial Park Development Plan the community prioritised each of the features proposed in the development plan. This information is attached as Appendix I.

Benefits

Delivers the programme in a highly responsive manner with regards community desires.

Risks

May impact upon costs and make the construction process more difficult with regards the splash pad.

Will see the Memorial Park Sports Trust gear shed (which is relatively minor) pushed out towards the end of the 10 Year Plan, and make their plans more difficult for them.

Financial

Financial implications will depend upon the nature and scale of the difficulty involved in not working in a cohesive design and construction pattern.

Contribution of Recommended Option to Council’s Strategic Direction

Active Recreation Strategy 2013.


 

Rationale for the recommendations

1.         Overview of the problem or opportunity

1.1       Council directed Officers to establish the community’s priorities for development at Memorial Park during consultation on the draft Memorial Park Development Plan in June of 2017. This was completed as part of the report titled Memorial Park Draft Reserve Development Plan: Stage II Consultation Results (attached as Appendix I of this report).

1.2       The Memorial Park Development Plan was adopted by Council in December 2017, and a section on community priorities was inserted as a section of the Memorial Park Draft Reserve Development Plan: Stage II Consultation Results.

1.3       During adoption of the Plan Councillors directed Officers to develop funding priorities and timeframes for the Memorial Park Capital Development Programme, and to present the findings to the March 2018 Sport and Recreation Committee.

1.4       This report describes those options and provides recommendations to Council, after considering community priorities (as per the results of Memorial Park Draft Reserve Development Plan: Stage II Consultation Results), stakeholder desires for the park and the practicalities of a construction programme. 

2.         Background and previous council decisions

2.1       In June 2016 a report went to Council titled Reserve Management Plan and Development Plan Priorities. In that report the priorities for developing both reserve management and development plans were laid out and adopted. Memorial Park was identified for a Reserve Development Plan only, due to occur in the 2016/17 financial year.

2.2       In September/October of 2016 Council began Stage 1 early public engagement with the community in order to understand the community’s desires for Memorial Park.

2.3       On 20 March 2017 Councillors attended a workshop on Memorial Park. In that workshop Councillors assessed the Stage 1 consultation results. The consultation results identified a number of features that the public would like to see developed at Memorial Park. While there were some new features the public identified as desirable for Memorial Park, the bulk of the work identified could best be described as restoring the park to its former status, as a Memorial Park and City Reserve.

2.4       The Stage 1 Community Engagement results were assessed in relation to the order of importance that the public placed on various features over the course of the consultation, and their relative costs to existing budgets. Councillors directed Officers to explore a number of features raised in the consultation that went beyond existing budgets.

2.5       The list below describes the general features identified for development and restoration/upgrade at Memorial Park. The bullet points are generally listed in order of importance as they emerged from the Stage 1 consultation process. Water features, playground upgrades and family area improvements were the clear top three priorities. Those that follow were less likely to be mentioned and may be seen as relatively equal under the top three priorities. 

2.6       The top three features were:

            Water Features

·    Splash Pad

·    Small water slide

            Playground Upgrades

·    Additional playground features (to be completed this 2017/18 financial year).

            Family Area and BBQ

·    Restore and extend existing.

            Equal Priority Features were:

Duck Pond

·    Improve the safety of the duck pond and keep it clean.

·    More activity in the vicinity of the duck pond.

            Memorial (WWII)

·    Lift the status of the park as a “Memorial” Park.

            General Amenity (described by consultation and Councillor direction)

·    Restore old architecture (particularly the old rink Grandstand).

·    Sensory garden (Councillor workshop 20 March 2017).

·    Old, tired toilets/change facilities in the sports field area that are now partially used as a janitor’s storage area. Should be renewed.

·    Gear shed established for the skating groups (plus rink-regrind which was completed under the approved 2016/17 Memorial Park Capital Development Programme).

·    General fencing and planting of the area to tidy it up, improve sight lines, etc.

·    Tidy up the grandstand and old velodrome area.

2.7       In March 2017 The Sport and Recreation Committee received the draft Memorial Park Reserve Development Plan. In that meeting Councillors decided that the plan was not yet in the right state to go to the public for consultation. The plan was updated and bought back to Council in June 2017.

2.8       In June of 2017 Council adopted the draft Memorial Park Development Plan to go out for Stage II public consultation under the Reserves Act 1977. Councillors directed Officers to include a section on community priorities for the development of the park in the consultation plan.

2.9       Once the Stage II consultation was complete Officers made the appropriate changes to the Draft Memorial Park Reserve Development Plan, creating a final plan recommended for adoption by Council. The proposed final went to the December 2017 Sport and Recreation Committee, and was adopted by Committee and later by full Council.

2.10     During the adoption of the Memorial Park Development Plan Council was presented with the community engagement report, including the analysis of community priorities. This document is attached as Appendix I of this report. Councillors directed Officers at that meeting to report to the March 2018 Sport and Recreation Committee with recommendations on priorities and timeframes going forward with the Capital Development Programme for Memorial Park.

2.11     In March 2018 Officers liaised with the Chair of the Sport and Recreation Committee and jointly made the decision to defer the priorities report until May 14 2018 Sport and Recreation Committee so that the consultation on the 10 Year Plan would be further advanced by that time. It was believed that Councillors would have had more time to digest feedback on the plan prior to receiving a priority report on spending at Memorial Park.

2.12     Since the adoption of the Memorial Park Reserve Development Plan by Council, a Programme was put up to the 2018-28 10 Year Plan for consideration. In that plan the splash pad was set to be funded in the 2019/20 financial year.  Council agreed to provide $250,000, and to fundraise the other $250,000 through external funders, with a total spend of $500,000. 

2.13     Since the establishment of the programme, Council’s Project Investment Coordinator has recommended that Council pull the programme forward to the coming financial year (2018/19). This is because Council, once committed to fundraising for the Central Energy Trust Arena grandstand upgrades, will find it challenging to successfully fundraise for other projects.

2.14     The Project Investment Coordinator has therefore recommended that Council approach external funders as soon as possible for the Memorial Park splash pad. The other option would be to defer the splash pad for approximately 3-4 years until after the CET Arena grandstand fundraising is complete.

3.         Description of options

3.1       Option 1: Council adopts the priorities for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme.

3.2       Option 2: Council adopts the priorities for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme, with amendments as determined by the Sport and Recreation Committee.

3.3       Option 3: Council adopts the priorities as sought from the community during consultation for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme.

4.         Analysis of options

4.1       Option 1: Council adopts the priorities for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme (refer Programme number 93), included in the 2018/28 10 Year Plan.

 

4.2       The Community Priorities for Memorial Park are (note: $50,000 is currently being spent in the 2017/18 financial year on accessibility and design):

 

 

Table 1

Feature

Priority

Cost

Proposed 2018/28
10 Year Plan

(financial years)

Proposed 2018/28
10 Year Plan

(budgets)

Splash Pad and water based features

1

$537,000 ($250,000 externally raised)

2018/19

$304,000 (if bought forward)

Duck Pond – landscaping and platforms

2

$65,000

2019/20

$57,000

Duck Pond – fill in the front

2

$35,000

2020/21

$53,000

Family area and BBQ

3

$17,000

2022/23

$295,000

Toilet upgrades

4

$250,000

2022/23

As above

Memorial Upgrades

5

$80,000

2023/24

$55,000

Accessibility and sensory garden

6

$6,000

2024/25

$57,000

Skating gear shed

7

$25,000

2025/26

$58,000

Upgrade sports field area

8

$15,000

2026/27

$59,000

Grandstand restoration

9

$30,000

2026/27

$61,000

Amenity general and contingency

1-10

$234,000

2018-2028

$62,000

Total

 

$1,061,000

2018/28

$1,061,000

 

4.3       There is some tension in how Council prioritises the work at Memorial Park. What the community has prioritised is different to the priorities for the Memorial Park Sports Trust, which desires the skating-based upgrades to be completed earlier so that they may get underway with their plans to revitalise the rink area.

 

4.4       Currently Officers have set up the old DJ booth to be used for skate rentals and this will serve the Trust well in the short term.

 

4.5       There is also a desire on behalf of the New Zealand Army (Linton) team to begin restoration work on the flagpole, begin the new entranceway, build the 20 pound gun emplacement and install the entrance gun.

 

4.6       The new entranceway should follow on directly from the installation of the splash pad (so that all the earthworks might be completed at once) and also work in with the redevelopment of the pool area and pool perimeter fencing.

 

4.7       This could be achieved by pushing the duck pond upgrades out to the 2023/24 year and pulling the skate gear shed and the memorial features forward to the 2019/20 financial year. The table below describes the recommended changes (the green budget line is to come forward and the red line is pushed out):

 

Table 2

Feature

Priority

Cost

Proposed 2018/28
10 Year Plan

(financial years)

Proposed 2018/28
10 Year Plan

(budget)

Splash Pad and water based features

1

$537,000 ($250,000 externally raised)

2018/19

$304,000 (if bought forward)

Memorial Upgrades

5

$80,000

2019/20

$57,000

Skating gear shed

7

$25,000

2020/21

$53,000

Family area and BBQ

3

$17,000

2022/23

$295,000

Toilet upgrades

4

$250,000

2022/23

As above

Duck Pond – landscaping and platforms

2

$65,000

2023/24

$55,000

Duck Pond – fill in the front

2

$35,000

2024/25

$57,000

Accessibility and sensory garden

6

$6,000

2025/26

$58,000

Upgrade sports field area

8

$15,000

2026/27

$59,000

Grandstand restoration

9

$30,000

2026/27

$61,000

Amenity general and contingency

10

$234,000

2027/28

$62,000

Total

 

$1,061,000

2018/28

$1,061,000

 

 

4.8       Officers believe that the above solution allows Council to work to both the most practical design/construction solution and deliver upon what the community desires to see occur first.

 

4.9       Option 2: Council adopts the priorities for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme, with amendments as determined by the Sport and Recreation Committee.

 

4.10     The base analysis for Option 1 holds for Option 2 also.

 

4.11     This option, depending on Council’s direction and the level and nature of the changes required, may require significant additional work prior to construction taking place. This option may require changes to the Memorial Park Capital Development Programme (refer Programme number 93) (should this programme be adopted by Council in the 2018-28 10 Year Plan).

 

4.12     Option 3: Council adopts the priorities as sought from the community consultation for the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme.

 

4.13     The base analysis for Option 1 holds for Option 3 also. However, this option has a number of complications:

 

·    The Memorial Park Sports Trust will need to wait significantly longer for their gear shed, and this may hinder their plans to revitalise the rink area.

 

·    There are some significant earthworks to occur as part of the splash pad build, the new entranceway and the playground development that are complimentary and would best be completed together. Option 3 may mean additional set-up costs and may result in the splash pad being closed, or potentially being damaged, when other work around the pool, entranceway and playground occurs. 

 

5.         Conclusion

5.1       Officers have recommended a priority list that both delivers on community expectations and ensures a complimentary and cost-effective construction process occurs on site refer Table 2 under Clause 4.7.

6.         Next actions

6.1       Establish design work for the splash pad and begin looking into external funding options with the understanding that this work remains dependent upon the adoption of the Memorial Park Capital Development Programme in the 10 Year Plan (Programme number 93). 

7.         Outline of community engagement process

7.1       During the adoption of the Memorial Park Development Plan Council was presented with the community engagement report, including the analysis of community priorities. This document is attached as Appendix I of this report.

7.2       If the Memorial Park Development Plan Capital Programme is adopted by Council, Officers will ensure signage is placed at the park describing the timing and order of the works, and the reasons why they are in that order.

Compliance and administration

All recommendations are subject to final 2018-28 10 Year Plan decisions.

 

Does the Committee have delegated authority to decide?

If Yes quote relevant clause(s) from Delegations Manual

No

Are the decisions significant?

No

If they are significant do they affect land or a body of water?

No

Can this decision only be made through a 10 Year Plan?

No

Does this decision require consultation through the Special Consultative procedure?

No

Is there funding in the current Annual Plan for these actions?

Yes

Are the recommendations inconsistent with any of Council’s policies or plans?

No

 

 

Attachments

1.

Memorial Park Development Plan Stage II Consultation Report

 

 

 

Jason Pilkington

Leisure Assets Planner

 

 

 

 


PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Report

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Campbell Street Campervan Carpark Trial

DATE:                            9 April 2018

AUTHOR/S:                   Jason Pilkington, Leisure Assets Planner, City Networks

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Council

1.   That Council adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark as a permanent inner City carpark for self-contained campervans.

2.   That Council approves dedicating a further three carparks as available for self-contained campervans at the existing Campbell Street carpark site.

 


 

Summary of options analysis for

 

Problem or Opportunity

In 2016 Council adopted the Campbell Street Carpark as a one year trial campervan carpark. Officers were directed to report on the performance of the carpark in June 2017. In June 2017 a report went to Council recommending that the trial continue for another year. This report concludes the extended trial and makes recommendations following the outcome of the trial.

OPTION 1:

Adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans, and investigate expansion of the car parking area to allow for additional self-contained campervan capacity.

Community Views

Views from those utilising the carpark have been overwhelmingly positive. Neighbours further down Campbell Street have had some concerns with overflow.

Benefits

This carpark is working well and has positive reviews. This option would allow Council to maintain a working inner city campervan carpark and also address any overflow issues.

Risks

Expansion may impinge upon any future likelihood of revenue from the leased section of this carpark.

Financial

$3,000 to $5,000 in additional markings and alterations to signage would be required if the investigation to expand the carpark proved positive.

OPTION 2:

Adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans with no further investigation of expanding this facility.

Community Views

Views from those utilising the carpark have been overwhelmingly positive. Neighbours further down Campbell Street have had some concerns with overflow.

Benefits

This carpark is working well and has positive reviews, and it makes sense to retain a working inner-city campervan carpark.

Risks

This option may see additional complaints with regards overflow as the City and carpark become more popular with campervans.

Financial

There is no additional financial implications that occur as a result of this option.

OPTION 3:

Do not adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans, and instead investigate other options for an inner city carpark for self-contained campervans.

Community Views

Views from those utilising the carpark have been overwhelmingly positive. Neighbours further down Campbell Street have had some concerns with overflow.

Benefits

Officers may discover a more appropriate and aesthetically pleasing inner-city site for visitors to the City.

Risks

This carpark is working well, and has become popular through word of mouth with self-contained campervan travellers. To dismantle the site now would be confusing, disruptive and likely result in complaints.

Financial

$3,000 to change the line markings back to the original size and to remove signage.

Contribution of Recommended Option to Council’s Strategic Direction

Active Recreation Strategy 2013.

Economic Well Being Strategy 2010.


 

Rationale for the recommendations

1.         Overview of the problem or opportunity

1.1       The one year trial of the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark has come to an end, and Officers are in a position to report on the performance of the carpark.

1.2       The Campbell Street Campervan Carpark has performed much better than originally expected, and consideration should be given to a possible expansion of the carpark area allocated to self-contained campervans.

2.         Background and previous council decisions

2.1       In the context of a discussion around parking for a Winter Festival at the 7 December 2015 Sport and Recreation Committee meeting the following resolution was made by Council:

28.2 That a feasibility study be undertaken on a permanent overnight Campervan Park located near the City Centre by the March 2016 Committee meeting.

2.2       On March 14 2016 Council received a report titled Permanent Overnight Campervan Park – Feasibility Study. The feasibility study described:

·    The types of motorhome included in the report (self-contained NZS 5465:2001) and those excluded (house buses, caravans, caravan trailers, converted Multi-Purpose Vehicles - MPVs).

·    The requirements of motorhomes (dump stations, parking spaces sizes, etc.).

·    A definition of freedom camping and how that relates to Palmerston North.

·    Observations from the CEO of New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA), Central Economic Development Agency (Destination Manawatu at that time) representative and a local NZMCA representative.

·    A selection of site options, an analysis of site options and a recommended site (Campbell Street).

2.3       During the discussion it was decided that rather than the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark becoming a “permanent” motorhome parking site, it would be treated as a trial for one year.

2.4       In April of 2017 the site was completed with regards the NZMCA requirements for a “Park over Property”. On May 19 2017 Campbell Street Campervan Site went live on the NZMCA website as a park over property.

2.5       On 7 June of 2017 the Sport and Recreation Committee received a report recommending that the trial be extended for a further year in order to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of the site, particularly given the lateness in setting up the trial.

2.6       Council, as part of place-making initiatives, commissioned a mural to be placed on the large wall owned by John Bates Wheel Alignment. The large mural is a picture of the Manawatū River including areas where motorhomes can park and stay. The mural is designed to be added to, and has the “#ThisIsMANAWATU” logo incorporated into it. The mural was jointly funded by Council, CEDA and NZMCA, and has proven popular and memorable.

 

2.7       A camera has also been added to the site, as per the recommendation of the 7 June 2017 report, to provide additional security for this now popular and well-used inner-city campervan site.

2.8       In order to monitor the performance of the site Officers have been taking a daily count at the Campbell Street site, receiving feedback from users as it comes through and receiving comments from both the NZMCA and the Palmerston North I-Site.

3.         Description of options

3.1       Option 1: Adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans, and investigate expansion of the car parking area to allow for additional self-contained campervan capacity.

3.2       Option 2: Adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans with no further investigation of expanding this facility.

3.3       Option 3: Do not adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans, and instead investigate other options for an inner city carpark for self-contained campervans.

4.         Analysis of options

4.1       Option 1: Adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans, and investigate expansion of the car parking area to allow for additional self-contained campervan capacity.

4.2       Survey Methodology: Council car parking attendants counted the number of campervans in the Campbell Street carpark every morning. The count was completed once per day, with no counts on Sundays or statutory holidays. Counts were completed daily from November 2017 until May 2018. Numbers for Sundays were assumed to be identical to Saturdays in order to estimate campervan numbers on these days.

4.3       Results – Total Numbers

4.4       The Campbell Street Campervan Carpark has experienced fairly steady growth of the last 6 months, with March 2018 exceeding all other months significantly.

4.5       There are 5 car parks in total dedicated to campervans in the carpark at Campbell Street. Days with 4 campervans and over are considered at capacity. 

4.6       Results – Capacity

4.7       The at-capacity days have been on the increase and in March reached a total of 8 days for that month.

4.8       Officers have received approximately 12 calls since the car park opened in relation to the carpark. The calls have generally asked for information on the carpark, and around 30% of calls were to express positive comments on the carpark. The main reasons noted with regards positive comments are:

·    Proximity of the car park to the shopping areas.

·    Proximity of the carpark to food and cafes.

·    The area is nice and quiet as well as central.

4.9       The Campbell Street Campervan Carpark has also received some criticism. This criticism has come from residential neighbours further along Campbell Street. Criticisms include:

·    Campervans are parking in the Campbell Street Reserve when the carpark becomes full.

·    Sometimes there is a mess in the carpark when things get busy.

·    The campervans are driving along Campbell Street (between Featherston Street and Walding Street) looking for the carpark and neighbours don’t like them driving down this road which has a series of chicanes.

·    Campervans that are not self-contained are sometimes parking in the carpark.

4.10     Council currently has 11 car parking spaces along the north-western edge of the Campbell Street Carpark, as seen in the blue circled area in the aerial below. Two of these spaces are leased. This could potentially yield another 3 campervan carparks without loss of existing leased space revenue, and would increase the number of campervan parks from 5 to 8.

4.11     Feedback from both Central Economic Development Agency and the New Zealand Motor Caravan Association has been extremely positive with regards the new campervan carpark. Both CEDA and NZMCA are asking for Councils numbers on campervans at the carpark in order to better understand campervan growth and movement in the City.

4.12     The Campbell Street Campervan Carpark as an inner-city campervan carpark has proven popular, numbers are increasing at the carpark and the carpark has hit capacity in under a year of it being open.

4.13     There are some issues with residential neighbours, the worst of which could be addressed through potentially expanding the carpark, and the provision of alternative sites.  However the NZMCA will be contacted to indicate in publications to their members that access to the site should not be along Campbell Street (between Featherston Street and Walding Street).

4.14     Since the complaints, Officers have been focusing on ensuring only self-contained campervans are using the carpark, calling in any rubbish issues quickly, considering better signage and are working with the I-Site and CEDA to keep an eye on the site. 

4.15     Option 2: Adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans with no further investigation of expanding this facility.

4.16     Analysis of Option 1 holds for Option 2. However, given the unforeseen popularity of the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark, this option does not allow Officers to explore expansion, which is likely to be required in the future. The existing car park at Campbell Street has potential for expansion. Moreover, it appears that the popularity of the carpark is essentially due to the centrality of the location, and therefore it would make sense to explore expanding the existing rather than looking for a new site.

4.17     Option 3: Do not adopt the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark at 82-86 Campbell Street as a permanent campervan carpark for self-contained campervans, and instead investigate other options for an inner city carpark for self-contained campervans.

4.18     This option was considered for some time as Officers were not fully convinced that the Campbell Street carpark would become a popular attraction. This however has proven unfounded, and the carpark continues to increase in popularity and positive comments. 

4.19     Two other options were looked into during the early investigation for possible sites. They were:

·    26A Ngata Street

·    311 Main Street

4.20     It was very difficult to find suitable sites that met the requirements for inner city parking. Campbell Street was considered the best site at the time, and little has changed to convince Officers that further analysis of sites would yield a different outcome.

4.21     Officers have been working through other recreation planning (Manawatū River Framework) to establish sites for self-contained campervans that have more of an aesthetic and recreation focus, and believe that these further future sites will both encourage a longer stay in Palmerston North Central and take some of the pressure off Campbell Street.  

5.         Conclusion

5.1       The Campbell Street Campervan Carpark continues to increase in use and popularity.

5.2       Any issues associated with the carpark coming from some residential neighbours may be dealt with in terms of both closer scrutiny, expansion and further future development.

6.         Next actions

6.1       Council adopts the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark as a permanent inner-city carpark for self-contained campervan units.

6.2       Investigate the expansion of the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark to include more carparks for campervans.

6.3       Continue to work with the NZMCA and CEDA on identification and development of recreation sites for self-contained campervans – particularly sites that encourage a longer stop-over in the City.

7.         Outline of community engagement process

7.1       All neighbours (commercial and residential) were consulted in 2016 prior to the adoption of the site as a campervan carpark.

7.2       Council has remained responsive to both positive comments and complaints related to the carpark during the length of the trial.

Compliance and administration

 

 

Does the Committee have delegated authority to decide?

If Yes quote relevant clause(s) from Delegations Manual <Enter clause>

No

Are the decisions significant?

No

If they are significant do they affect land or a body of water?

No

Can this decision only be made through a 10 Year Plan?

No

Does this decision require consultation through the Special Consultative procedure?

No

Is there funding in the current Annual Plan for these actions?

Yes

Are the recommendations inconsistent with any of Council’s policies or plans?

No

 

 

Attachments

Nil

 

Jason Pilkington

Leisure Assets Planner

 

 

  



 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Report

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Palmerston North Self-Contained Campervan Dump Stations

DATE:                            11 April 2018

AUTHOR/S:                   Jason Pilkington, Leisure Assets Planner, City Networks

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Council

1.   That Council consider developing two new self-contained campervan dump stations during final 10 Year Plan deliberations (as Programme 1535 - City-Wide - Campervan Dump Stations.

 

 


 

Summary of options analysis for

 

Problem or Opportunity

In 2016 Council constructed a temporary campervan dump station at the Totara Road site. This site was a key requirement for Palmerston North achieving Motor Home Friendly status. The site that the dump station is on however is a key Council strategic asset and a work site. Council plans to alter public access at the site in which the temporary dump station is located, meaning it will no longer be accessible. In order to retain Palmerston North’s Motor Home Friendly City status Council will need to find a new site.

OPTION 1 – CONSTRUCT 2 CAMPERVAN DUMP STATIONS:

Council commits to funding for two campervan dump stations in the 2019/20 & 2023/24 financial years of the 2018-28 10 Year Plan. One at Maxwells Line and one in the Fairs Road area. 

Community Views

Surveys of local New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA) members show a high level of satisfaction with Palmerston North being motor-home friendly and having a dump station.

Council has been working with NZMCA members to identify where the dump stations should be, and how many would be best suited to Palmerston North.

Benefits

This option ensures Palmerston North retains its status as Motor Home Friendly City.

This option also allows for NZMCA members to utilise dump stations at the two primary City entranceways – Pioneer Highway and Rangitikei Line.

Risks

This option requires Council to include a significant amount of funding towards a project in the 10 Year Plan at a late stage in consultation.

Financial

$120,000 needs to be presented to the 2018-28 10 Year Plan final deliberation process;  with site 1 being constructed in the 2019/20 year and site 2 in 2023/24

OPTION 2 – CONSTRUCT ONE CAMPERVAN DUMP STATION:

Council commits to funding for one dump station at Maxwell’s Line in the 2019/20 financial year of the 2018-28 10 Year Plan.

Community Views

Surveys of local New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA) members show a high level of satisfaction with Palmerston North being motor-home friendly and having a dump station.

Council has been working with NZMCA members to identify where the dump stations should be, and how many would be best suited to Palmerston North.

Benefits

This option ensures Palmerston North retains its status as Motor Home Friendly City.

Risks

Palmerston North is experiencing a higher volume of motor home traffic, and growth appears strong. Council risks not having plans in place for growth.

Financial

$60,000 needs to be presented to the 2018-28 10 Year Plan final deliberation process;  with work being constructed in the 2019/20 financial year.

OPTION 3 – DO NOT CONSTRUCT ANY CAMPERVAN DUMP STATIONS:

Council does not commit to funding for any dump stations in Palmerston North at this stage.

Community Views

Surveys of local New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA) members show a high level of satisfaction with Palmerston North being motor-home friendly and having a dump station.

Council has been working with NZMCA members to identify where the dump stations should be, and how many would be best suited to Palmerston North.

Benefits

Council does not commit to additional funding so late in the 10 Year Plan process.

Risks

Palmerston North and Council worked hard to become Motor Home Friendly. Since gaining status the number of visitors to the City in self-contained motor homes has been increasing. This option risks losing a significant proportion of that market.

Council may well be lobbied by the NZMCA if the City loses its status as Motor Home Friendly City.

Financial

There are no financial implications associated with this option.

Contribution of Recommended Option to Council’s Strategic Direction

Active Recreation Strategy 2013.

Economic Well Being Strategy 2010.


 

Rationale for the recommendations

1.         Overview of the problem or opportunity

1.1       In 2016 Council, in partnership with the New Zealand Motor Caravan Association (NZMCA), constructed a temporary dump station for self-contained campervans at the Totara Road Waste Water Treatment Plant.

1.2       The construction of the dump station was the final step for Palmerston North to acquire the status as a Motor Home Friendly City.

1.3       The Totara Road Dump Station is centrally located in the Totara Road Waste Water Treatment Plant. This plant is a key strategic Council asset and is also an operational worksite.

1.4       Council staff are planning to make some alterations to the site, including limiting public access, which is a key health and safety consideration. This will mean an end to public access to the site and to campervans. For Palmerston North is to retain its status as a Motor Home Friendly City it is necessary to identify a new site and to construct a more permanent option.

2.         Background and previous council decisions

2.1       In 2015 NZMCA approached what was then Destination Manawatū with the intention of working towards Palmerston North becoming a Motor Home Friendly City. Destination Manawatū and later the Central Economic Development Agency (CEDA) began working with the NZMCA and Council staff to establish what work would be required to achieve that status.

2.2       The key factor in achieving Motor Home Friendly City status was ensuring an adequate publicly available dump station for self-contained campervans. At that time there was an existing dump station at the Totara Road Waste Water Treatment Plant, and Officers established what work was required to bring the existing dump station up to specification for campervans.

2.3       The existing dump station required a potable water source, a cover over the dump site and signage. These features were completed in 2017 and the City achieved Motor Home Friendly City status.

2.4       When making the required alterations to the dump station, Officers were made aware that at some point changes to availability of this site to the public would be reviewed. This review occurred sooner than expected and a decision was made that public access at this site would no longer be managed in the same way. Currently anyone can drive into the site, and this type of access (which is key for a publicly available dump station), will become more limited.

2.5       Palmerston North has seen what appears to be a significant rise in the number of self-contained campervans visiting and staying in the City since becoming motor home friendly.

·    Council’s Campbell Street overnight campervan carpark has experienced steady increase in numbers over the last year.

·    NZMCA membership numbers have increased by 9.18% between 2017 and the same time for 2018.

·    Growth in the Manawhenua Region (of which Palmerston North is part) has increased from 1409 members in 2017 to an increase of 1450 so far in 2018, and is expected to rise well beyond that figure by end of year.

·    I-Site have reported a steady increase over the last 2 years in self-contained campervans coming into the City and staying. The I-Site has been sending campervans steadily to Campbell Street.

2.6       In June 2017 Officers reported on the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark (which was under a 1 year trial at the time) and requested a continuation of the trial period until June 2018, so as to give the trial a longer timeframe. At that meeting a co-authored survey report on NZMCA members (co-authored by PNCC, CEDA and NZMCA) was attached describing what NZMCA members are looking for in a destination, their travel habits in relation to Palmerston North and what they believe would improve their experience in Palmerston North. Ensuring adequate service areas for their motor homes featured prominently in that survey (see attached as Appendix I of this report).   

2.7       In December 2017 the NZMCA’s magazine The Motor Caravanner featured its first article in an ongoing series titled “Off the Beaten Track”. Palmerston North City and surrounds featured prominently in that article. NZMCA strategy for Palmerston North City is to work with local (CEDA and PNCC) agencies to build upon the “off-the-beaten-track” feature for promoting the City in the future and growing numbers of motor-home visitors to the region.

2.8       In response to this, Council has been working with NZMCA and CEDA to ensure that self-contained motor homes remain a prominent feature in parks planning – to ensure parking and facilities allow for turning circles, over-sized car-parks and aesthetically pleasing river access points close to the City. This is in an effort to build upon increasing numbers, the Motor Home Friendly City Status and the success of the Campbell Street Campervan Carpark. 

2.9       In March 2018 Officers worked with NZMCA members to identify potential sites for dump stations. NZMCA members believe that the City requires two sites – one at the Maxwell’s Line City entranceway vicinity; and one at the Rangitikei Line City entranceway vicinity.

2.10     In April 2018 Officers identified two potential sites that would suit self-contained motor homes. One is on Maxwell’s Line in Awapuni and the other on Fairs Road in Milson.

3.         Description of options

3.1       Option 1 – Construct two campervan dump stations: Council commits to funding for two dump stations in the 2019/20 and 2023/24 financial years of the 2018-28 10 Year Plan. One at Maxwells Line and one in the Fairs Road area. 

3.2       Option 2 - Construct one campervan dump station: Council commits to funding for one dump station at Maxwell’s Line in the 2019/20 financial year of the 2018-28 10 Year Plan.

3.3       Option 3 – Do not construct any campervan dump stations: Council does not commit to funding for any dump stations in Palmerston North at this stage.

4.         Analysis of options

4.1       Option 1 – Construct two campervan dump stations: Council commits to funding for two dump stations in the 2019/20 & 2023/24 financial years of the 2018-28 10 Year Plan. One at Maxwells Line and one in the Fairs Road area. 

Future Demand

 

4.2       Growth in numbers of self-contained campervans in Palmerston North appears to be strong over the last two years in particular. This growth is most likely linked to:

 

·    The City becoming a Motor Home Friendly City.

·    People coming to the City for events and festivals.

·    General growth in NZMCA members.

·    A growing desire for destinations that could be called “off-the-beaten track”.

 

 

4.3       PNCC, CEDA and NZMCA recently developed and held a survey of NZMCA members. Desires for location features from this group of people as described in the recent survey shows what NZMCA members most value in a location:

 

·    Out of the way and off the traditional tourist run.

·    Dog friendly off leash sites.

·    River or ocean-side settings.

·    Privacy and seclusion (not too far from town - central).

·    Immediate recreation opportunities.

·    Ability to get to services (I-Site, dump station, etc.).

 

4.4       There remain some of the traditional aspects of visitors coming to see friends and family or stopping over on the way to another destination. However, promoting the “off-the-beaten-track” features in Palmerston North and the surrounds may result in the City becoming more of a destination in itself to this group of tourists. Once the development of riverside locations (and others) for campervans begins to take form, the City should begin to experience higher numbers of visitors in self-contained campervans coming to the City for something out of the way, slightly unusual and not packed with high numbers of overseas visitors.

 

4.5       In particular, riverside parks with dog-off leash and dog facilities, combined with recreation activities, and all in a relatively close proximity to the City centre, are likely to be highly sought after destinations.

Site Location

4.6       In April 2018 Officers identified two potential sites that would suit self-contained motor homes. One is on Maxwell’s Line in Awapuni and the other on Fairs Road in Milson.

4.7       The Maxwell’s Line proposed site is in an existing waste treatment and collection sub-station. The site is ideal for the following reasons:

·    Proximity to the main highway in and out of the City south.

·    Relatively hidden from neighbours and at an adequate distance without being unsafe.

·    The waste collection facility has the required depth of piping to make gravity-fed waste disposal ideal.

·    Enough space to have large exit/entrance bay that will not require on-site turning of large vehicles.

·    Entrance and exit to site is off the main highway and easy to enter and exit.

·    Proximity to the old (existing) dump station – so as to lessen confusion.

·    Highly navigable site and easy to find for people coming to the City or the site for their first time. 

·    Close to Ahimate Reserve – which may likely become a highly valued off-the-beaten-track destination for NZMCA membership.

4.8       The Fairs Road site could see the dump station situated on either the storm water retention area on the southern side of the road or at the entranceway to Colquhoun Park on the northern side. If Council decides to fund two dump stations, then a final decision with regards the site at this end of town would not be required for some years yet.

4.9       Both sites adjoin the industrial zone on their southern borders and residential on their north-eastern borders. Both sites are ideal for the following reasons:

·    Bordering industrial zoned land and proximity to neighbours.

·    Entrance/exit can be established without the need for large vehicle turning circles on site.

·    Pipes, particularly at the Colqhoun Park site, are deep enough and easy to access for gravity fed waste disposal units.

·    Proximity to main northern entranceway to the City.

Costs to Construct and Funding Commitments

4.10     Construction costs are highly volatile right now and there is significant uncertainty in this environment. Engineer’s estimates for the dump stations indicate a figure of $60,000 per dump station.

 

4.11     The cost to construct each site is approximately $60,000, and NZMCA will provide the actual dump station facility and a portion of the construction cost. This is a total 10 Year Plan commitment of $120,000.

 

4.12     The first dump station for construction would be the Maxwell’s Line dump station. This is because the site is much easier to finalise with regards logistics and planning, and also because it would be best to maintain a site in the vicinity of the current dump station given that NZMCA membership have grown accustomed to the general area.

 

4.13     It is recommended that construction occur in the 2019/20 financial year of the 2018-28 10 Year Plan (with design work completed in the 2018/19 financial year), and that the second site come online in the 2023/24 financial year (with design in the 2022/23 financial year). It is also recommended that $6,000 for design costs go into the 2018/19 financial year for the first dump station.  This gives Council plenty of time to plan for both sites, and allows the second site to come online at a time when growth projections in NZMCA numbers would see a second site being more viable.

 

4.14     Under Option 1 Palmerston North retains its Motor Home Friendly City status.

 

4.15     Option 2 - Construct one campervan dump station: Council commits to funding for one dump station at Maxwell’s Line in the 2019/20 financial year of the 2018-28 10 Year Plan.

 

4.16     The analysis for Option 1 holds for Option 2.

 

4.17     Under the Option 2 scenario, Council would only commit to build a single dump station, and this would best be suited to the Maxwell’s Line site. This is because of the proximity to both the Pioneer Highway entrance to the City, and to the existing dump station at Totara Road.

 

4.18     Under this option Council would be required to commit to an additional $60,000 to the proposed 2018-28 10 Year Plan in the 2019/20 financial year.

 

4.19     Under Option 2 Palmerston North retains its Motor Home Friendly City status.

 

4.20     Option 2 does not commit to or fully recognise the current growth in both NZMCA membership and the number of campervans now coming to Palmerston North. It is likely that Officers will be required to suggest a second dump station at the next iteration of the 10 Year Plan.

4.21     Option 3 – Do not construct any campervan dump stations: Council does not commit to funding for any dump stations in Palmerston North at this stage.

4.22     Option 3 involves Palmerston North as a City turning away from retaining its status as a Motor Home Friendly City. This option does not recognise both the number of people in campervans coming into the City or the projected increase and existing benefits from this group of visitors.

4.23     Council is likely to be lobbied by both CEDA and NZMCA on behalf of the campervan community, should this option be chosen. Much of the work to date has occurred between the officer levels of both organisations.

4.24     This Option will not require any funding. The option may also require Officers to re-examine the existing commitment through pro-active parks planning for self-contained campervans at various sites around the City. This is because the dump stations are the logistical minimum for welcoming self-contained motor homes to the City.

5.         Conclusion

5.1       Campbell Street Campervan Carpark numbers, NZMCA membership and NZMCA Manawhenua membership has been growing strongly over the last one-two years.

5.2       Existing parks planning is taking account of the growing popularity of campervans, the types of desirable locations, activities and logistical requirements that they need. Moreover, Council is working with the NZMCA to develop the City’s popularity as an “off-the-beaten-track” location.

5.3       As a minimum logistical requirement for being a Motor Home Friendly City, Palmerston North is required to have a public dump station for self-contained campervans.

5.4       The existing site (where the temporary dump station is located) must eventually begin to limit public access, particularly due to both the sensitivity of the site as a key Council asset and the fact that the site is an operational work site. 

5.5       For Council to appropriately manage the increase in campervans coming to Palmerston North and to retain the City’s status as a Motor Home Friendly City, the City must have a permanent dump station site established - ideally one at each end of the City in close proximity to both main entranceways.

6.         Next actions

6.1       Refer the proposed programme to the final 10 Year Plan deliberations.

6.2       Begin a more detailed site analysis.

6.3       Develop engineered plans for the site and receive quotes.

7.         Outline of community engagement process

7.1       Council, CEDA and NZMCA carried out an extensive survey of the NZMCA  membership in order to better understand the views of the self-contained campervan community.

7.2       All planning of potential sites will be subject to appropriate levels of community engagement and public notices.

7.3       Community engagement will be relative to the outcomes of site selection.

Compliance and administration

Refer new programme to the proposed 2018-28 10 Year Plan final approval deliberations.

 

Does the Committee have delegated authority to decide?

If Yes quote relevant clause(s) from Delegations Manual <Enter clause>

No

Are the decisions significant?

No

If they are significant do they affect land or a body of water?

No

Can this decision only be made through a 10 Year Plan?

No

Does this decision require consultation through the Special Consultative procedure?

No

Is there funding in the current Annual Plan for these actions?

No

Are the recommendations inconsistent with any of Council’s policies or plans?

No

 

 

Attachments

1.

NZMCA Membership Survey 2017

 

 

 

Jason Pilkington

Leisure Assets Planner

 

 

  


PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

PDF Creator


 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Memorandum

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Manawaroa Park Toilet Facilities

DATE:                            14 March 2018

AUTHOR/S:                   Ian Stuart, Building Asset Officer, City Networks

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Sport and Recreation Committee

1.   That the Committee receive the memorandum titled “Manawaroa Park Toilet Facilities”, as information only.

 

 

 

1.         ISSUE

On 7th December 2017 an article appeared in the Manawatu Standard titled “Croquet players fear getting stuck in the loos”.  Essentially the story was about the size of the cubicles at the changing room part Manawaroa Park Pavilion being far too small. (https://www.stuff.co.nz/manawatu-standard/news/99617189/croquet-players-fear-getting-stuck-in-the-loos)

The Rose City Croquet Club was to host an international tournament in late January 2018 and approached Council about improving the toilet facilities in the changing rooms to accommodate the international croquet competitors.

2.         BACKGROUND

The Manawaroa Pavilion was constructed in 1970 and the changing facilities had not been significantly upgraded since that time. The size of the original toilet cubicles in the changing room part of the pavilion no longer meet current standards.   In 2008 the social area and kitchen were upgraded.  The toilets in the social area had been adequate for croquet fixtures until the international tournament was hosted. 

Following the newspaper article, Council officers met with Vince Neall (and others) from Rose City Croquet Club at the pavilion to discuss the issues and find a solution.  It was agreed to reduce the number of toilet cubicles in the changing room part of the pavilion from four to two to allow extra cubicle size.  Pans and cisterns were to be replaced as well as repainting the toilet facilities in the pavilion part of the building to freshen them up.

Other general maintenance was also carried out such as spraying the roof for lichen control, clearing out the gutters, replacing the pan and cistern in the referees toilet as well as a general tidy up to allow use for the tournament.

The cladding on the existing toilet partitions was found to contain asbestos, the quantity of the material was such that an asbestos removal specialist was required to remove it.  The cost of all works at the pavilion, including asbestos testing and removal totalled $14,146.38.

3.         NEXT STEPS

The feedback received from the Rose City Croquet Club after the tournament was very positive.  The Croquet Club have requested Council complete painting the rest of the changing rooms to tidy them up, this will be completed in the coming months.

The pavilion as a whole is not programmed for renewal in the 2018-28 10 Year Plan as there are other pavilions in greater need and with greater demand on them.  With appropriate maintenance the Manawaroa Pavilion will not require major renewals in the immediate future.

4.         Compliance and administration

Does the Committee have delegated authority to decide?

If Yes quote relevant clause(s) from Delegations Manual <Enter clause>

No

Are the decisions significant?

No

If they are significant do they affect land or a body of water?

No

Can this decision only be made through a 10 Year Plan?

No

Does this decision require consultation through the Special Consultative procedure?

No

Is there funding in the current Annual Plan for these actions?

Yes

Are the recommendations inconsistent with any of Council’s policies or plans?

No

 

 

Attachments

Nil

 

Ian Stuart

Building Asset Officer

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Memorandum

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Fitzherbert Park - Cricket Ground Enhancements Update

DATE:                            26 April 2018

AUTHOR/S:                   John Brenkley, Parks & Property Manager, City Networks

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Council

1.   That Council note Programme 1342 Fitzherbert Park Cricket Ground Enhancements may not be delivered in 2017/18 given that external funding from the Manawatu Cricket Association may not be secured.

 

 

 

1.         ISSUE

Programme 1342 Fitzherbert Park Cricket Ground Enhancements has a budget of $265,854 which covers four projects at Fitzherbert Park to enhance the facility status as a first class cricket venue.  The Council contribution to this project is $175,664 and the Manawatu Cricket Association (MCA) is contributing the balance which they intend to raise from external grant applications.  To date no money has been spent against the budget.

2.         BACKGROUND

The MCA submitted to the 2017/18 Draft Annual Budget with five projects that they consider will positively contribute to achieving their strategic priorities to develop and grow the Manawatu Cricket Association Cricketing Facilities and profile in New Zealand.  Council is contributing to four of these projects.  See table below for details.

Development

Overall Costs

MCA Contribution

PNCC Contribution

1 - Grass Practice Facilities & Nets

$204,039

$69,373

$134,666

2 - Sightscreens

$30,000

$10,000

$20,000

3 - Scorers, Officials & Press Box

$21,815

$7,417

$14,398

4 - Bruce Turner Pavilion Upgrade

$10,000

$3,400

$6,600

              Total

$265,854

$138,239

$175,664

 

Furthermore MCA will establish an Electronic Scoreboard estimated to cost $48,049 being fully funded by the Association.

Programme 1342 Fitzherbert Park Cricket Ground Enhancements was included in the 2017/18 Annual Budget with a gross budget of $266k.  Council contribution is $175,664 and the balance is subject to MCA gaining external funding from grant applications.

Grass Practice Facilities and Nets

The design is complete, no consents are required, contract documents have been prepared and sent out for pricing.  One contractor has offered two prices, one as per the tender documents and one with an alternative irrigation system proposal.

One more quote is still to be received.

Once a contractor and price has been agreed, this information needs to be incorporated into a funding application to the Lion Foundation for the next round of funding.  Construction cannot start until the funding has been confirmed.

Assuming the funding application is successful, construction is likely to be in June / July 2018.

Sightscreens

One quote has been received for the Sightscreens, MCA are awaiting a second quote.  Again once a contractor and price has been agreed, this information needs to be incorporated into a funding application to the Lion Foundation for the next round of funding.  Construction cannot start until the funding has been confirmed. This will be June 2018 at the earliest.

Scorers, Officials and Press Box

Two quotes have been received for this work and a preferred contractor has been selected.  The contractor is available to start as soon as the funding is approved. This will be June 2018 at the earliest.

Bruce Turner Pavilion

Two quotes have been received for this work and a preferred contractor has been selected. The contractor is available to start as soon as the funding is approved. This will be June 2018 at the earliest.

3.         NEXT STEPS

Once all of the quotes have been received and contractors and prices confirmed, the information will be incorporated into an application for funding to the Lion Foundation.  The Lion Foundation has verbally said that they will fund the remainder of the funds required beyond the PNCC portion. This should take about a month to be approved. 

 

 

4.         Compliance and administration

Does the Committee have delegated authority to decide?

If Yes quote relevant clause(s) from Delegations Manual <Enter clause>

No

Are the decisions significant?

No

If they are significant do they affect land or a body of water?

No

Can this decision only be made through a 10 Year Plan?

No

Does this decision require consultation through the Special Consultative procedure?

No

Is there funding in the current Annual Plan for these actions?

Yes

Are the recommendations inconsistent with any of Council’s policies or plans?

No

 

 

Attachments

Nil

 

John Brenkley

Parks & Property Manager

 

 

 

 



 

 

 


PALMERSTON NORTH CITY COUNCIL

 

Committee Work Schedule

TO:                                Sport and Recreation Committee

MEETING DATE:           14 May 2018

TITLE:                            Committee Work Schedule

 

 

RECOMMENDATION(S) TO Sport and Recreation Committee

1.   That the Sport and Recreation Committee receive its Work Schedule dated May 2018.

 

 

Attachments

1.

Committee Work Schedule

 

    


PDF Creator